Select Page

Vatican ex-diplomat sentenced to five years on child pornography charges

Vatican ex-diplomat sentenced to five years on child pornography charges 23 June 2018 Image copyright Vatican Media/Reuters Image caption Father Capella (left, with his lawyer) was tried at the Vatican A former Vatican diplomat has been sentenced to five years in...

Government suspends licence of biggest live sheep exporter

The live sheep trade has been dealt a massive blow, with the government suspending the export licence of Emanuel Exports, the biggest exporter and the company responsible for the 2017 Awassi Express shipment that triggered the furore around the industry. The...

I’ve always wondered: why do we get dark circles under our eyes?

This is an article from I’ve Always Wondered, a series where readers send in questions they’d like an expert to answer. Send your question to alwayswondered@theconversation.edu.au I’ve always wondered why we get dark circles under our eyes, and whether anything can be...

Anthony Albanese sets out his blueprint for Labor

Labor frontbencher Anthony Albanese has urged Labor to “engage constructively” with business, empower its party branches and make sure it avoids “allowing tactics to marginalise strategy”, in a speech that will be seen in the context of leadership. Albanese’s Gough...

EU tariffs on US goods come into force

22 June 2018 Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionWhat are tariffs and how do they affect us?The European Union (EU) has introduced retaliatory tariffs on US goods as a top official launched a fresh attack on President Donald Trump's trade policy....

Refugee crisis: the immediate and lasting impacts of powerful images

This article is about the power of emotive images to create social and political change. However, we have chosen not to display distressing images, including those of Aylan Kurdi, for ethical reasons. Recent images and footage of migrant children housed in wire cages...

You probably missed the latest national environmental-economic accounts – but why?

The Australian Bureau of Statistics released the Australian Environmental-Economic Accounts on June 15. It’s a fine achievement, which shows, among other things, growing efficiency in water and energy use. That’s good for both the economy and the environment. Less...

VIDEO: Michelle Grattan on the federal government’s tax package, the ABC and the ‘Super Saturday’ byelections

Michelle Grattan discusses the week in politics with University of Canberra Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Vice-President Academic Professor Nicholas Klomp, including, the government’s income tax package success, the Liberal’s motion to privatise the ABC, the push for...

Home and Away’s Orpheus Pledger helped stop street attack

Home and Away's Orpheus Pledger helped stop street attack 22 June 2018 Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Orpheus Pledger plays Mason Morgan on Home and Away Home and Away actor Orpheus Pledger has described how he intervened to help a woman who was being...

Feeding frenzy: public accuse the media of deliberately fuelling shark fear

Are you scared of sharks? If you never read or watched the news, would you still be? Last year’s Senate inquiry on shark mitigation and deterrent measures heard evidence that media coverage has contributed to “disproportionately high fear of sharks among the public...

Who gets what? Who pays for it? How incomes, taxes and benefits work out for Australians

The Australian Bureau of Statistics has just released its latest analysis of the effects of government benefits and taxes on household income. Overall, it shows government spending and taxes reduce income inequality by more than 40% in Australia. Disparities between...

World Cup 2018: Denmark 1-1 Australia

Australia's Mile Jedinak converts VAR penaltyDenmark manager Age Hareide said video assistant referees are taking the "charm" out of the World Cup after Australia scored a debatable penalty to keep their last-16 hopes alive.Australia cancelled out Christian Eriksen's...

You probably missed the latest national environmental-economic accounts – but why?

The Australian Bureau of Statistics released the Australian Environmental-Economic Accounts on June 15. It’s a fine achievement, which shows, among other things, growing efficiency in water and energy use. That’s good for both the economy and the environment. Less...

Refugee crisis: the immediate and lasting impacts of powerful images

This article is about the power of emotive images to create social and political change. However, we have chosen not to display distressing images, including those of Aylan Kurdi, for ethical reasons. Recent images and footage of migrant children housed in wire cages...

Another tale of two cities: access to jobs divides Sydney along the ‘latte line’

Sydney’s so-called “latte line” divides the city in two by jobs. Specifically, our research shows residents are segregated by both overall access to jobs and access to white-collar jobs. This highlights the jobs inequality underlying residential segregation. The...

Friday essay: Australia’s dangerous obsession with the Anglosphere

Over the past three weeks the ABC program Four Corners has presented special reports on American politics, which involved one of our best journalists, Sarah Ferguson, travelling to the US on special assignment. I watched these programs and I enjoyed them. But in part...

Having a brain injury does not mean you’ll get dementia

Two recent studies recently drew a link between traumatic brain injuries and dementia. Understandably, media outlets were quick to report on these findings. The Los Angeles Times ran the story: Even a mild case of traumatic brain injury is linked to an increased risk...

Vital Signs: we are witnessing a slowly deflating property bubble, for now

Vital Signs is a regular economic wrap from UNSW economics professor and Harvard PhD Richard Holden (@profholden). Vital Signs aims to contextualise weekly economic events and cut through the noise of the data affecting global economies. In a week that was fairly...

Doomsaying about new technology helps make it better

That new technologies could actually be bad for us, by sapping our attention or ruining our memories, is an argument that goes back to Socrates. It’s tempting to summarily dismiss these concerns, but such tech-doomsaying is actually an important part of economic...

Clive Palmer has a Trump-style slogan, but is no sure bet to return to parliament

With August 4th looming as the earliest possible date for an election of the full House of Representatives and half the Senate, the founder of the now-defunct Palmer United Party and former MP, Clive Palmer, has flagged his intention to run again. The new incarnation...

Why I joined #500queerscientists

I recently joined an online initiative called 500 Queer Scientists. At 500 Queer Scientists, LGBTQ+ people are encouraged to post their picture online along with a short summary describing themselves and their work in science. LGBTQ+ is an acronym referring to...

Data ethics is more than just what we do with data, it’s also about who’s doing it

If the recent Cambridge Analytica data scandal has taught us anything, it’s that the ethical cultures of our largest tech firms need tougher scrutiny. But moral questions about what data should be collected and how it should be used are only the beginning. They raise...

Grattan on Friday: Government celebrates on tax, fights on energy

The odds were always in the government’s favour in the battle to get its A$ 144 billion income tax package through parliament. However much some Senate minnows might have objected to the package’s third stage – taking effect way out in 2024 and favouring the wealthy –...

How’s it going, Mal? Why Australians can get away with familiarity but French schoolboys can’t

On Monday this week French President Emmanuel Macron was greeting some high school students at a ceremony in western Paris to commemorate General Charles De Gaulle’s call for resistance in the second world war. It became an unlikely lesson in French manners. Greeting...

Jacinda Ardern baby: New Zealand PM gives birth to girl

Jacinda Ardern baby: New Zealand PM gives birth to girl 21 June 2018 Image copyright @jacindaardern Image caption New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern posted a picture on Instagram of her with her new baby New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has given...

Teaching law students creative skills could save the profession from automation

Making science for people is a series that explores how humanities, arts and social sciences expertise is applied to problems typically corralled into the science and technology space. Today’s article involves technology, but in a legal sphere. It looks at how...

The gig economy is nothing new for musicians – here’s what their ‘portfolio careers’ can teach us

The “gig economy” has been the life for musicians for many years. Despite financial instability and the prospect of unemployment, why do musicians choose this type of work? And what can we learn from their motivations? A study published by the Australia Council for...

Australia’s public servants: dedicated, highly trained … and elitist

One of the limitations of popular rule is that the people can’t vote on every matter. Instead, faced daily with complex decisions on everything from the environment to aviation to foreign affairs, governments often take the lead. But governments still consult citizens...

Lowy Institute Poll shows Australians’ support for climate action at its highest level in a decade

The annual Lowy Institute Poll on Australian attitudes to the world and global issues for 2018 has been released. Among a series of interesting findings, one thing is clear: support for climate action and renewable energy continue to grow. In response to the survey’s...

New river council will give traditional owners in the Kimberley a unified voice

Traditional owners in Western Australia’s Kimberley region have formed a new organisation to help manage the Fitzroy River. The Martuwarra Fitzroy River Council could set a precedent in WA for collaborative planning between government, industry and the native title...

Why alcohol after sport and exercise is a bad idea

Drinking alcohol after sport is a social ritual that has become ingrained in Australian culture, and it seems professional athletes are no exception, despite being paid generously to be in peak physical condition. Watching many types of professional sport in...

Take heart, charity stunts can make CEOs better people

Thousands of CEOs across the country will sleep “rough” tonight to raise money for homelessness. But is one night of sleeping rough enough to truly empathise with those who do it every night? And are CEOs who take part in the Vinnies CEO Sleepout just doing it as a...

Bangarra’s Dark Emu is beautiful, but lacks the punch of its source material

Review: Dark Emu Lights come up on an orb receding back in space, an echo perhaps taking us back in time, or into the cosmos, into the dreaming to the Emu in the Sky. Dancers, in groupings of three or five, move stage right to left, undulating up from the ground and...

How eye disorders may have influenced the work of famous painters

Vision is an important tool when creating a painted artwork. Vision is used to survey a scene, guide the artist’s movements over the canvas and provide feedback on the colour and form of the work. However, it’s possible for disease and disorders to alter an artist’s...

We don’t own data like we own a car – which is why we find data harder to protect

It’s known as the “privacy paradox”: people say they want to protect their data privacy online, but often do little to keep it safe. Why? We propose that it’s because people find data difficult to own – and things we don’t own, we tend not to protect. This is a...

Why we don’t need to prepare young people for the ‘future of work’

While there is little consensus about the “future of work”, one thing is certain – young people are at the coalface. Young workers experience insufficient opportunities for work experience, a mismatch between work and education, a lack of career management skills and...




Latest Australia News

Anthony Albanese sets out his blueprint for Labor

Labor frontbencher Anthony Albanese has urged Labor to “engage constructively” with business, empower its party branches and make sure it avoids “allowing tactics to marginalise strategy”, in a speech that will be seen in the context of leadership. Albanese’s Gough...

EU tariffs on US goods come into force

22 June 2018 Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionWhat are tariffs and how do they affect us?The European Union (EU) has introduced retaliatory tariffs on US goods as a top official launched a fresh attack on President Donald Trump's trade policy....

World Cup 2018: Denmark 1-1 Australia

Australia's Mile Jedinak converts VAR penaltyDenmark manager Age Hareide said video assistant referees are taking the "charm" out of the World Cup after Australia scored a debatable penalty to keep their last-16 hopes alive.Australia cancelled out Christian Eriksen's...

Doomsaying about new technology helps make it better

That new technologies could actually be bad for us, by sapping our attention or ruining our memories, is an argument that goes back to Socrates. It’s tempting to summarily dismiss these concerns, but such tech-doomsaying is actually an important part of economic...

Why I joined #500queerscientists

I recently joined an online initiative called 500 Queer Scientists. At 500 Queer Scientists, LGBTQ+ people are encouraged to post their picture online along with a short summary describing themselves and their work in science. LGBTQ+ is an acronym referring to...

Jacinda Ardern baby: New Zealand PM gives birth to girl

Jacinda Ardern baby: New Zealand PM gives birth to girl 21 June 2018 Image copyright @jacindaardern Image caption New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern posted a picture on Instagram of her with her new baby New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has given...

Why alcohol after sport and exercise is a bad idea

Drinking alcohol after sport is a social ritual that has become ingrained in Australian culture, and it seems professional athletes are no exception, despite being paid generously to be in peak physical condition. Watching many types of professional sport in...

Take heart, charity stunts can make CEOs better people

Thousands of CEOs across the country will sleep “rough” tonight to raise money for homelessness. But is one night of sleeping rough enough to truly empathise with those who do it every night? And are CEOs who take part in the Vinnies CEO Sleepout just doing it as a...

Daily digest email

Recent Bulletins

Archives

Categories

Recent Posts

June 2018
M T W T F S S
« May    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  

Pin It on Pinterest