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Over a third of Australian women suffer from urinary incontinence, and it’s estimated at least half of women who’ve had more than one child have some degree of genital prolapse.

Pelvic floor disorders affect many women, and health professionals often recommend exercising the pelvic floor muscles in order to keep them strong to reduce symptoms and prevent disorder.

We asked five experts if all women should be exercising these muscles regularly.

Five out of five experts said yes

Here are their detailed responses:


If you have a “yes or no” health question you’d like posed to Five Experts, email your suggestion to: alexandra.hansen@theconversation.edu.au


Disclosures: Hannah Dahlen has received funding from the NHMRC and ARC. Victoria Salmon receives funding from the UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the NIHR, NHS or the Department of Health.

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